540-347-7610

info@citizensforfauquier.org

P.O. Box 3486

Warrenton, VA 20188

© 2020 Citizens for Fauquier County

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HISTORY

PROTECT historic resources

 One way CFFC strives to preserve the historic resources of Fauquier County is to identify places and events that make our region unique and to document the findings for the benefit of the public and for land use planning. We feel the myriads of historic resources available to us are significant and worthy of identification and preservation. Through our history, we can learn about our past and therefore, take pride in where we live and take strides to preserve the quality of life that has been present for hundreds of years.

 

 CFFC has been the impetus for having three distinct properties listed on the State and National Registers of Historic Places. This designation is an honor and does not impede a person’s property rights.

 

 In 2006, our Historic Resources committee raised over $20,000 to hire a consultant to study and to document over 22,000 acres of rural land in the northern part of the County. This Rural Historic District (RHD) is named the John Marshall Leeds Manor RHD. This area qualified for Register status because little has changed in the landscape and structures since the days of John Marshall, Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

To recognize local Civil War battlefields, CFFC was awarded two separate grants from the American Battlefield Protection Program (ABPP), an arm of the Department of the Interior, to hire consultants to study and to document the battlefields of Auburn I and Auburn II with a grant of $25,000. In 2011, a $55,000 grant made it possible to study the Civil War Troop Movement along the Rappahannock River in Fauquier and Culpeper Counties.

 

 The reports on all three of the Register honorees are available on line and at our three local libraries.

 

 CFFC has been contributors to the Comprehensive Plan Chapter on battlefield preservation, and co-sponsored a Civil War symposium. An effort to have the Springs Valley RHD recognized by the Registers did not come to fruition, but the documentation collected is available at the County’s Community Development office.